By Brad Friedman on 1/18/2014, 7:11pm PT  

From the new documentary MITT, via Byron York...

"That's what I start with: 'Dad,'" [Mitt] Romney explained. "I always think about dad and about I am standing on his shoulders. I would not be there, there's no way I would be able to be running for president if dad hadn't done what dad did. He's the real deal..."

"You're the real deal," said one of Romney's sons.

Romney didn't pause. "The guy was born in Mexico. He didn't have a college degree. He became head of a car company and became a governor. It would have never entered my mind to be in politics, how can you go from his beginning to think, I can be head of a car company, I can run for governor, I can run for president?"

Romney wasn't finished. "The gap --- for me, I started where he ended up. I started off with money and education, Harvard Business School, Harvard Law School. For me it's moving that far" --- Romney held two fingers close together --- "For him, it's like that," Romney said, holding his arms wide apart.

So, like the Koch Brothers before him, who inherited their father's success only to work hard to limit the possibilities of others gaining the same, Mitt Romney recognizes, at least privately (and now in a documentary film which had unprecedented access to private moments during his last two Presidential campaigns), that he started off more advantaged than, say, 99% of Americans.

Jim Hightower once said that George H.W. Bush was "born on third base and thought he had hit a triple." Romney was also born on third base, but at least he has the decency to admit it. At least in private. While otherwise publicly describing his fellow citizens who who weren't born on third, like him, as 'takers'.

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The official trailer for MITT, premiering on Netflix beginning on January 24, follows below...