With Brad Friedman & Desi Doyen...
By Desi Doyen on 1/17/2012, 2:46pm PT  


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IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: The owners of the Keystone XL pipeline confirm the Republican/Fox 'News' lie about the number of jobs it will produce; Italian cruise ship crash threatens to become an environmental disaster as well; Two offshore oil disasters for Nigeria; PLUS: Despite concerns from the U.S. Coast Guard, it's full speed ahead for drilling in the Arctic ... All that and more in today's Green News Report!

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IN 'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (see links below): Peak coal: a 'crisis in the making'; ‘Congress is effectively controlled by climate change deniers’; Unlocking the secrets behind fracking; Bulgarians protest fracking; Scientists link farm pesticides to mass death of bees; Loggers 'burned Amazon tribe girl alive' ... PLUS: 'Half a degree': good news for the climate ... and much, MUCH more! ...

STORIES DISCUSSED IN TODAY'S 'GREEN NEWS REPORT'...

'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (Stuff we didn't have time for in today's audio report)...

  • What will we do about coal’s ‘crisis in the making’? (Coal Tattoo):
    [It's] a “crisis in the making” in Boone County, where coal is such a big part of the economy, yet good coal seams are playing out and competition from other regions threatens future production levels.
  • AFL-CIO Head Rich Trumka: ‘Congress Is Effectively Controlled By Climate Change Deniers’ (Think Progress Green):
    Speaking at the 2012 United Nations Investor Summit on Climate Risk & Energy Solutions, AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka blasted climate deniers in Congress for threatening the free enterprise system and the future of civilization. Trumka began his speech laying out the stark challenge of global warming: a “stable climate is the foundation of our global civilization,” and thus “the prerequisite for a profitable investment environment.”
  • Unlocking the Secrets Behind Hydraulic Fracturing (Texas Tribune):
    Starting Feb. 1, drilling operators in Texas will have to report many of the chemicals used in the process known as hydraulic fracturing. Environmentalists and landowners are looking forward to learning what acids, hydroxides and other materials have gone into a given well.

    But a less-publicized part of the new regulation is what some experts are most interested in: the mandatory disclosure of the amount of water needed to “frack” each well. Experts call this an invaluable tool as they evaluate how fracking affects water supplies in the drought-prone state.

  • Bulgarians protest, seek moratorium on shale gas (Reuters):
    Thousands of Bulgarians protested throughout the Balkan country on Saturday against exploration for shale gas, worried it would poison underground waters, trigger earthquakes and pose serious public health hazards.
  • Scientists link mass death of British bees to farm pesticides (The Scotland Herald):
    Nicotine-based pesticides in widespread use by farmers are implicated in the mass deaths of bees, according to a new study by US scientists.

    The authoritative, peer-reviewed research undermines the pesticide industry's long-repeated arguments that bees are not being harmed, and piles pressure on UK and US authorities to follow other countries by introducing bans on the chemicals.

  • Loggers 'burned Amazon tribe girl alive' (Telegraph UK):
    Loggers in Brazil captured an eight-year-old girl from one of the Amazon's last uncontacted tribes and burned her alive as part of a campaign to force the indigenous population from its land, reports claimed on Tuesday night.
  • Anti-Labor Koch Brothers Launch $6 Million Solyndra ‘Workers’ Attack Ad (Think Progress Green)
  • New Readily Available And Inexpensive Material Could Remove Carbon Dioxide From Atmosphere At Unprecedented Rate (Think Progress Green):
    Scientists have discovered a potentially groundbreaking new weapon in the fight against excessive atmospheric carbon dioxide. According to Science Daily, a group of scientists including chemistry Nobel Laureate George A. Olah have found that polyethylenimine, a common and inexpensive material, can be used to achieve "some of the highest carbon dioxide removal rates ever reported for humid air, under conditions that stymie other related materials."
  • How to tackle the climate, health and food crises, all at the same time (Guardian UK):
    Reducing the soot pumped out by cars and cooking fires and the methane from coal mines and oil wells would rapidly curb global warming, prevent air pollution deaths and boost crop yields

    From coal mines to rice paddies and cooking fires to diesel exhausts, 14 highly cost-effective measures could quickly curb global warming and save millions of lives, while also boosting global food production. That is the striking conclusion of a new study published in Science and the most authoritative look yet at the opportunities offered in tackling methane and black carbon - soot - pollution.

    The headline findings are striking.

  • MORE: To Slow Climate Change, Cut Down On Soot, Ozone (NPR)
  • Helping Teachers Stand Up for Science (NYT Green):
    The National Center for Science Education, a nonprofit group in Oakland, Calif., monitors legislation and local school board actions that are potentially threatening to the teaching of evolution. It also acts as a resource and adviser for science teachers who encounter problems with students, parents or supervisors on the issue. Climate change educators had no similarly devoted resource — until now.

    On Monday, the center announced that it was putting climate change under its umbrella as well.

  • American Petroleum Institute's Scientific Director Questions ‘Any Effect At All’ From Greenhouse Pollution (Think Progress Green)
  • Cow manure to power new King County plant (MyNorthwest.com):
    One of the biggest problems facing dairies trying to stay alive in rural King County is what to do with all the cow manure. But this week, construction began on a new plant in Enumclaw that will convert manure into electricity, cutting environmental costs and helping reduce emissions.
  • Essential Climate Science Findings: