With Brad Friedman & Desi Doyen
GOP Debate/ Dem Forum Special Coverage...
By Desi Doyen on 11/12/2015, 1:14pm PT  

IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: 'GNR' Special Coverage: 2016 Republican and Democratic Presidential candidates talk climate, energy, and the path forward --- or not... All that and more in today's Green News Report!

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IN 'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (see links below): Blowing Smoke: Report Says Violations Belie Chem Industry Rhetoric; After historic flooding, Death Valley gears up for 'a long, hard recovery'; G20 Nations Spend $452 Billion a Year Supporting Fossil Fuels: Study; Fire Chiefs, White House See Climate Change Impact on Wildfires; Paris Climate Talks Not Just Hot Air, France Tells U.S; Montreal Sewage Dump Proceeding as Planned; Arizona Copper Smelter to Slash Emissions, Pay $163M; BP Oil Spill Dispersants Hindered Rather Than Helped, Study Says... PLUS: Native Americans Oppose Stripping Protection From Yellowstone Grizzlies... and much, MUCH more! ...

STORIES DISCUSSED ON TODAY'S 'GREEN NEWS REPORT'...

'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (Stuff we didn't have time for in today's audio report)...

  • Blowing Smoke: Report Says Violations Belie Chem Industry Rhetoric (Center for Effective Government):
    Large chemical companies and their major trade association and lobbying arm, the American Chemistry Council, say they can maintain high safety standards through self-regulation and voluntary actions. Our report finds this isn't the case. Voluntary standards don’t work, and existing regulations are not effectively enforced.
  • After historic flooding, Death Valley gears up for 'a long, hard recovery' (LA Times):
    Hardest hit was one of the park's best-known tourist stops, the area surrounding Scotty's Castle, a rambling medieval-style villa erected in steep and narrow Grapevine Canyon in the 1920s. The floodwaters in Grapevine Canyon flowed at an estimated rate of about 93,000 cubic feet a second, 10 times that of a 100-year flood, official said. Damage estimates are in the tens of millions of dollars.
  • G20 Nations Spend $452 Billion a Year Supporting Fossil Fuels: Study (AFP):
    The G20 group of major economies spend $452 billion per year supporting fossil fuel industries, despite their primary role in causing climate change, according to a study released on Thursday.
  • Fire Chiefs, White House See Climate Change Impact on Wildfires (McClatchy DC):
    Fire chiefs from California, Idaho, Washington and other vulnerable states reinforced on Monday the Obama administration’s campaign against climate change.
  • Paris Climate Talks Not Just Hot Air, France Tells U.S (Reuters):
    Any global climate change deal reached in Paris next month will be legally binding and have a concrete impact, France's foreign minister said on Thursday, reacting to U.S. comments that questioned the status of the accord.
  • Montreal Sewage Dump Proceeding as Planned: Mayor (Toronto Globe & Mail):
    The City of Montreal says the controversial process of dumping eight billion litres of raw sewage into the St. Lawrence River went off without a hitch as it got under way on Wednesday.
  • Native Americans Oppose Stripping Protection From Yellowstone Grizzlies (Reuters):
    Native American tribes on Wednesday called for the U.S. government to halt plans to strip grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone of Endangered Species Act protection because it would open the way for trophy hunting in Idaho and two other states bordering the national park.
  • European Scientific Advisers Say Glyphosate Unlikely To Cause Cancer (Reuters):
    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on Thursday said glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto weedkiller Roundup, was unlikely to cause cancer in humans, but it proposed new controls on any residues in food.
  • Arizona Copper Smelter to Slash Emissions, Pay $163M (Environment News Service):
    Mexican copper miner, smelter, and refiner ASARCO must pay more than $163 million to settle U.S. government charges that the company broken the law by releasing hazardous air pollutants, including lead and arsenic, from its primary copper smelter in Hayden, Arizona.
  • BP Oil Spill Dispersants Hindered Rather Than Helped, Study Says (CS Monitor):
    Dispersants used to encourage the oil's breakdown actually hindered microbes that were helping clean-up the huge slick, says new research.
  • Carbon Emissions Fall in 11 of G20 Members, in Turning Point (Reuters):
    Greenhouse gas emissions per capita are falling in 11 of the Group of 20 major economies, a turning point for tackling climate change, a study showed on Tuesday.
  • Exxon, Keystone, and the Turn Against Fossil Fuels (Bill McKibben, The New Yorker] [emphasis added]:
    T]he fossil-fuel industry—which, for two centuries, underwrote our civilization and then became its greatest threat—has started to take serious hits.... There is, now, an elsewhere to head.... Inevitability was their shield, but no longer. If we wanted to transform our energy supply, we clearly could, though it would require an enormous global effort.The fossil-fuel industry will, of course, do everything it can to slow that effort down; even if the tide has begun to turn, that industry remains an enormously powerful force, armed with the almost infinite cash that has accumulated in its centuries of growth.


FOR MORE on Climate Science and Climate Change, go to our Green News Report: Essential Background Page

  • Skeptical Science: Database with FULL DEBUNKING of ALL Climate Science Denier Myths
  • 4 Scenarios Show What Climate Change Will Do To The Earth, From Pretty Bad To Disaster (Fast CoExist):
    But exactly how bad is still an open question, and a lot depends not only on how we react, but how quickly. The rate at which humans cut down on greenhouse gas emissions--if we do choose to cut them--will have a large bearing on how the world turns out by 2100, the forecasts reveal.
  • How to Solve Global Warming: It's the Energy Supply (Scientific American):
    Restraining global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius will require changing how the world produces and uses energy to power its cities and factories, heats and cools buildings, as well as moves people and goods in airplanes, trains, cars, ships and trucks, according to the IPCC. Changes are required not just in technology, but also in people's behavior.
  • Warning: Even in the best-case scenario, climate change will kick our asses (Grist)
  • NASA Video: Warming over the last 130 years, and into the next 100 years: