Admin cites 'smallest cost growth over 3-yr period in U.S. history'...
By Brad Friedman on 11/24/2013, 5:08pm PT  

Let's keep this a secret from the U.S. corporate media, but, as Sy Mukherjee and Andrew Breiner note at ThinkProgress...

On Wednesday, the new head of the White House Council of Economic Advisers released a bombshell report finding that U.S. health care spending since 2010 has increased by just 1.3 percent - the smallest cost growth over a three-year period in American history - while prices in the health care sector rose by 50-year lows, thanks in part to structural changes made by the Affordable Care Act. But most media outlets ignored that story, instead choosing to focus on ongoing glitches with the Healthcare.gov website.

According to a ThinkProgress analysis, English-language online and print media published about ten times as many pieces on the troubles with the Obamacare site than they did on the new health care spending report.

They go on to explain that analyst opinion remains mixed, at the moment, as to the extent of the Affordable Care Act's influence on the "remarkable slowdown in health spending" since the bill's passage in 2010, but that "savings from the ACA's hospital payment reforms" and "more efficient and collaborative care models" as "encouraged by Obamacare" are among the factors...

Regardless, the record slowdown is one of the most important economic developments of the decade, and has huge ramifications for the fiscal viability of major programs like Medicare and Medicaid. In fact, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has already cut its projections for Medicare and Medicaid's price tag in 2020 by $147 billion - a 10 percent reduction from previous estimates.

That's significant because those health entitlements are the primary driver of U.S. debt.

Say what you like about Obamacare, (we've long been loud supporters of a much better and more moral system here), and there is no question that the rollout of Healthcare.gov website has been a disaster (though Speaker John Boehner got a swell deal using the D.C. exchange to purchase his own private health care policy last week), but it would be nice if the U.S. corporate media reported on the many benefits and upsides of the legislation (and there are many) as they do on the downsides and partisan driven drivel.

But that would only work if the corporate media were there to actually inform and educate the electorate, as envisioned by the Constitution, rather than there to serve corporate shareholders.